Birds that come to CO from AK -Nat. Petroleum Reserve nesting grounds

May 16, 2012

 Fifteen species of birds, ducks, shorebirds and geese migrate to or through Colorado from their nesting grounds in Alask'a National Petroleum Reserve.    There is ample room for the BLM to select a reasoned balance of leasing for oil and gasdevelopment AND conservation within the Alaska Reserve (National Petroleum Reserve).  Alternative B  in the draft Enviornmental Impact Statement strikes that balance. Public comment period is open until June 1.  Please send in your comments to BLM via their website or by mail to BLM,  RE: NPR-A IAP/EIS Comments, AECOM Project Office, 1835 South Bragaw St., Suite 490, Anchorage AK  99508

Here is the list of the 15 species:

Northern Pintail - during winter migrate across the continental US including Colorado.  This area is especially important in years of drought in Canada which results in overflight by pintails to Teshekpuk Lake.  Up to 6 percent of the continental population can occur there in years of drought.

 Greater White-Fronted Geese – up to 35,000  – 6 percent of the mid-continent breeding population  (migrate and winter in the Central flyway (and Mississippi flyway) and many migrate to Colorado.

Snow geese, Canada geese and Tundra swans - tens of thousands use Teshekpuk Lake as a molting area, which is the largest goose molting area in the Arctic (migrate and winter in the Central flyway, including Colorado (as well as Mississippi and Atlantic flyways). 

 Black-bellied Plover - postbreeding migrant along Colorado’s South Platte River Valley

 American Golden-Plover – 9.1 percent of population at Teshekpuk Lake – postbreeding migrant along Colorado’s South Platte River Valley

 Ruddy Turnstone – 3.1 percent of population breeding at Teshekpuk Lake – postbreeding migrant migrant along Colorado’s South Platte River Valley

 Semipalmated Sandpiper – high density/abundance breeding at Teshekpuk Lake Area, 7.5 percent of population breeding in Teshekpuk Lake – postbreeding migrant along Colorado’s South Platte River Valley

Baird’s Sandpiper – most numerous postbreeding migrant along Colorado’s South Platte River Valley, Blanca Wetlands (San Luis Valley) is a nationally significant site for migrating BASA

Pectoral Sandpiper – high density/abundance breeding at Teshekpuk Lake Area, 13.8 percent of population breeding in Teshekpuk Lake – postbreeding migrant along Colorado’s South Platte River Valley

Dunlin – high density/abundance breeding at Teshekpuk Lake Area, 12.8 percent of population breeding in Teshekpuk Lake – postbreeding migrant along Colorado’s South Platte River

Stilt Sandpiper – 0.7 percent of population breeding at Teshekpuk Lake – 3rd most numerous postbreeding migrant along Colorado’s Platte River

 Buff-breasted Sandpiper – postbreeding migrant along Colorado’s South Platte River Valley

 Long-billed Dowitcher – high density/abundance breeding at Teshekpuk Lake Area, 8.5 percent of population breeding in Teshekpuk Lake – 6th most numerous postbreeding migrant along Colorado’s South Platte River Valley

Red-necked Phalarope – highdensity/abundance breeding in Teshekpuk Lake Area, 2.8 percent of population breeding at Teshekpuk Lake – postbreeding migrant along Colorado’s South Platte River Valley

Red Phalarope – high density/abundance breeding in Teshekpuk Lake Area, 8.2 percent of population breeding at Teshekpuk Lake – postbreeding migrant along Colorado’s South Platte River Valley

 

 

 

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