Colorado's Principles for Advancing Outdoor Recreation and Conservation

January 23, 2018

 Colorado's Principles for Advancing Outdoor Recreation and Conservation

cpw.state.co.us/partners

CWF has signed onto these Principles.

Preamble
We believe the uniquely American public land heritage is a privilege and a birthright,  and Colorado's abundant open space and outdoor recreation opportunities contribute to  our quality of life and economic vitality.  Combined with the North American Model  of wildlife management and private land conservation, Coloradans and our visitors enjoy  spectacular landscapes in which to work, play and live. We celebrate the contributions  of all sectors of our economy to sustaining a healthy balance of our State's ecosystems. Responsible recreation respects all interests on lands and waters, and works to eliminate  conflicts.    For these reasons, Coloradans should feel compelled to care for and conserve landscapes,  waterways and wildlife to sustain them and eliminate conflicts for generations to come by adopting the following principles:

1. Outdoor recreation and conservation require that a diversity of lands
and waters be publicly owned, available for public access and cared for
properly.

2. Within Colorado's diversity of land and waters, private land plays a
critical role in preserving the ecological integrity of a functional
landscape that is necessary for robust and meaningful outdoor recreational
experiences.

3. Both recreation and conservation are needed to sustain Colorado's
quality of life.  Both are beneficial to local economic well-being, for
personal health, and for sustaining Colorado's natural resources.

4. All recreation has impact.  Coloradans have an obligation to minimize
these  impacts across the places they recreate and the larger landscape
through ethical outdoor behavior.

5. Proactive management solutions, combined with public education, are
necessary to care for land, water and wildlife, and to provide the
protections needed to maintain quality recreation opportunities.

6. Physical, biological and social science must inform the management of
outdoor recreation.

7. Stable, long-term, and diverse funding sources are essential to protect
the environment and support outdoor recreation.
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